Chatting with Jodi Mikesell, Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipient

 

We caught up with our Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipient, Jodi Mikesell.Mikesell

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant supported Jodi’s participation in the Brooklyn Conference at The Brooklyn Museum.

 

Describe the opportunity you participated in and how it aligns with your career aspirations.

The event I attended was The Brooklyn Conference at The Brooklyn Museum. This three-day event centered around inspiring social change through a confluence of art, artists, politics, and social justice. Over three days, many issues were discussed, but of particular interest to me was the topic of shifting institutional priorities- specifically the museum space as a catalyst for social change. The Arts Administration program helped to shape the path of my career by highlighting the important role that museums play in shaping the cultural values of our society. The Brooklyn Conference aligned with those aspirations by providing an in situ experience of how we as administrators can champion and foster social change through the institutional power of the museum.

What were the most important takeaways from your experience?

The biggest takeaway of the conference was the ability to directly align the lessons I had learned in ARAD with their practical, real-life applications within the museum setting. I was also able to attend talks which were both personally fulfilling and beneficial to informing my thesis research, which I am writing on women and museum leadership. Another takeaway was in exploring the role of the artist within society with the artists who strive to create impact and learning strategies we can use to create inclusive and dynamic cultural communities.

How has the microgrant helped to enrich you professionally? 

Over three days and dozens of speakers, I have learned and grown tremendously. Over the weekend I was able to personally engage and network with other socially-minded people within the art world and was able to make new contacts with NYU faculty, independent curators, art teachers, and social activists- all of with whom I have remained in contact. Working toward social change is exhausting and at times, the emotional fatigue can make a person question whether they are up for the challenge- especially during a time of such political contention. Surrounding oneself with people who are actively working toward a common good is profoundly empowering. Knowing that we are all present for the same cause creates an unspoken bond of purpose and opens up channels of communication. I left The Brooklyn Conference feeling a renewed sense of vigor and recharged in my commitment to the work I want to do.

 

Catching up with Gillian Jakab, Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipient

We caught up with our Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipient, Gillian Jakab.Gillian Jakab Resized

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant supported Gillian’s participation in “Transmissions and Traces: Rendering Dance”, a joint conference held by the Congress on Research in Dance and Society of Dance History Scholars at The Ohio State University.

 

Describe the opportunity you participated in and how it aligns with your career aspirations.

I presented a paper at the Society of Dance History Scholars (SDHS) and Congress in Research on Dance (CORD) joint conference “Transmissions and Traces: Rendering Dance,” marking the merger of the two renowned academic organizations into the Dance Studies Association (DSA). The conference was held at The Ohio State University and brought together hundreds of dance scholars from dozens of nations for a three-day event representing the largest gathering of its kind in the field.  The conference was an extraordinary opportunity to share my research on cultural diplomacy during the Cold War.  My research sprung from work I had begun last year as Professor Victoria Phillips’ student in the course “Cold War Public Diplomacy” within Columbia University’s History Department.  I examined the U.S. State Department’s repeated decisions declining the applications of avant-garde choreographer Merce Cunningham to become part of its overseas Cultural Presentations program in the 1950s and ’60s.  I analyzed the source materials, including the minutes of the State Department Dance Panel, as well as contemporaneous media accounts, and historical treatments to conclude that just as the State Department used the Dance Panel to further its hegemony in the world, so the Dance Panel members used the State Department to maintain their hegemony in the dance world.

More valuable than my own experience presenting as part of a panel, however, was the access to the three days of panels, talks, and workshops with leading scholars and professionals discussing critical issues and new pathways in the field.  The chance to spend quality time with those I know well—Professor Clare Croft of the University of Michigan as well as my colleagues from dance historian Lynn Garafola’s Columbia Dance Studies seminar—was surpassed only by the chance to meet and learn from so many new thinkers and doers.  Scholars and arts organizations have much to learn from one another and I hope to help facilitate that dialogue during my career .

 

GJakab- conf2What were the most important takeaways from your experience?

One panel I attended titled “Developing American Audiences” extended the concepts of the institutionalization of high culture that ARAD’s Dr. Gemma Mangione introduced in the course “Arts in Context.”  On this panel, Caroline Clark presented her paper “Highbrow Versus Lowbrow: Dance Transmission through Social Agendas in the United States.” Clark drew on the literature we had read of Paul DiMaggio and Lawrence Levine, framing the formation of aesthetic hierarchies within the specific context of dance, as did Judith Hamera in her keynote address “Rehearsal Problems: Gus Giordano’s The Rehearsal, Canonicity, and the Place of the Local in Dance Studies.” I was left with a more nuanced understanding of the ways in which classifications of taste have shaped the dance cannon we generally accept, study, and present.

Another presentation that resonated with my thesis research and topics I’ve encountered through my work at the Cultural Services of the French Embassy was Karima Borni’s paper “From Street to Studio: Muslimness and Masculinity in Moroccan Contemporary Dance Workshops.” In this presentation, Borni sifted through the layers of identity formation in contemporary Moroccan dance and illuminated the power dynamics between local dancers and the predominantly European choreographers who circulate through official performance channels.

GJakab- conf

How has the microgrant helped to enrich you professionally? 

The ARAD microgrant helped me participate in an invaluable weekend of conversations surrounding the theme of “transmitting dance”—a topic that spawned a wealth of presentations and workshops connected to my academic and professional interests.  As an aspiring arts professional, I valued the opportunity to meet and hear from others in the field and discuss the challenges of presenting and documenting dance and its history. The conference panels and workshops explored wide-ranging topics in relation to dance such as intellectual property and copyright, authorship/spectatorship, archival projects, education and audience engagement, as well as topics of identity and social justice in dance history and theory.

Follow up with Lauren Williams, Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipient

Lauren Williams_Headshot

We followed up with our Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipient, Lauren Williams.

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant supported Lauren’s participation in the American Institute of Graphic Art’s AIGA Design Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

 

Describe the opportunity you participated in and how it aligns with your career aspirations.

On October 13-14, 2017 I had the opportunity to attend the American Institute of Graphic Art’s AIGA Design Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota. During the conference I attended general sessions along with 2,000 fellow designers and symposia with enlightening guest speakers. This year’s theme was Connect and according to Tina Essmake, 2017 Conference Chair, this theme was chosen because “we’re all in search of meaningful connections to the work we do—and ultimately, to each other.”

The conference allowed me to create new connections and expand my professional network, which provides access to future opportunities within the design industry. The speakers also helped me to create meaningful connections between ideas and projects they were presenting to ideas that I plan on pursuing in the realm of social design and the arts in the future.

I attended symposia including Type in the City and Design for Business Impact. In addition to symposia I also gained inspiration from speakers including:

Rhea Combs, Museum curator, photography and film, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture

Joe Gebbia, Chief product officer and cofounder, Airbnb

Ian Spalter, Head of design, Instagram

Elise Roy, Inclusive design strategist, Elise Roy & Associates

Annie Atkins, Graphic designer for film

 

What were the most important takeaways from your experience?

Each year the conference touches upon inclusive design. I found the talk given by Elise Roy, Inclusive Design Strategist at Elise Roy & Associates, most intriguing. Roy discussed how designing for extreme users, like people with disabilities, benefits us all. A major takeaway from her talk is that we can’t continue to make design for people with disabilities an afterthought or an element that is incorporated in phase 2.0 or 3.0. It has to influence the original design. As arts administrators and designers we must commit to universal design strategies.

 

How has the microgrant helped to enrich you professionally? 

The connections made via the microgrant such as networking opportunities, increased awareness of resources, and links to new ideas from speakers have enriched me professionally. I believe that in order to effectively grow it is important to remain involved in the communities in which I am interested in operating in. The micogrant supported me by providing access to a space of like-minded individuals who are tackling innovative projects and concepts that have an impact on society. It also allowed me to enter into a space that emphasized the importance of responsible design, not only supporting my professional development, but also those within communities that interact with my work.

 

 

Follow up with Angelica Tran, Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipient

We followed up with our Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipient, Angelica Tran.

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant supported Angelica’s participation in the Metropolitan Opera Guild’s DaCapo Arts Administration Intensive at the Opera Learning Center at Lincoln Center.

 

 

 

Describe the opportunity you participated in and how it aligns with your
career aspirations.
I attended the Metropolitan Opera Guild’s DaCapo Arts Administration Intensive,
which is a two-day program held at the Opera Learning Center at Lincoln Center. The
intensive featured panelists from different arts organizations who spoke about
important topics related to performing arts management, as well as their careers.
This year’s sessions and panelists included:

 

Advanced Planning and Production; Crisis Management
-Jeremy Geffen, Director of Artistic Planning, Carnegie Hall
-Martin Platt, General Partner, Perry Street Theatricals

 

Artist and Personnel Management
-Steve Greer, Company Manager, The Phantom of the Opera
-Bernard Uzan, Director, Uzan Artists Talent Management
Community Outreach & Education
-Stuart Holt, Director of School Programs and Community Engagement,
Metropolitan Opera Guild
-Shirley Taylor, Director of Education, Apollo Theater
Development in Action
-Katherine Delaney, Director of Development, Metropolitan Opera Guild

 

 

Building a Career in the Arts
-Leah Barto, independent arts & philanthropy consultant
-Devin Day, Assistant Stage Manager, 1984

 

Many of the sessions included discussions and problem solving exercises that
were conducted in small groups. For example, after the Crisis Management
session, we worked in small groups to solve a hypothetical crisis in an
organization. We examined different ways that we could solve the project while
taking into consideration how our solution would impact the budget and the
organization as a whole. A few of the crisis examples included customer service
issues, a lead soloist dropping out from a program at the last minute, and serious
set malfunctions prior to the start of a performance. In our Community Outreach
and Education workshop, we designed education programs for different groups in our communities. Our group work was presented to the whole class, which
allowed us to receive feedback from the panelists and our peers.
One of the highlights of the intensive was the backstage tour of the Metropolitan
Opera House. We really got a sense of all of the moving parts that go into creating
and staging an opera. We were all very excited to take our group picture on the
stage.
This opportunity aligns with my career aspirations because my goal is to work in a
performance arts organization that is related to music. The sessions and
workshops at DaCapo focused on the performance arts, which is relevant to my
interests. In addition, DaCapo was created through the Community Engagement
department, which aligns with my interests in working in education and
community engagement. As such, DaCapo serves as an example of a program that
I could help implement in the future to help aspiring arts administrators.

What were the most important takeaways from your experience?
Some of the key ideas that came up across the different sessions were the
importance of communication, relationship building, and flexibility. In terms of
creating community engagement opportunities, it is crucial to have an open
dialogue with the communities to find out their unique needs and desires. The
programs that we create should be tailored to fit the communities of interest,
which is best achieved through relationship building and communication. Another
instance in which relationship building was emphasized is with the board,
employees, and volunteers of our organization. There are many people who go
into the production of a concert, show, etc., and it is important to develop
rapport and build trust with the different departments in the organization. This
opens the lines of communication, which can allow for the effective
communication of both praise and constructive criticism. The panelists also
emphasized that we should be malleable and flexible not only with the programs
that we create, but also with the development of our careers as emerging arts
administrators. Many of the panelists suggested that we keep an open mind and
take advantage of new opportunities that may come our way, even if it requires
stepping out of our comfort zone a bit.

How has the microgrant helped to enrich you professionally?
The ARAD microgrant enabled me to participate in the DaCapo Intensive which was extremely beneficial to gain insight about working in the field. During the two-day intensive, I was able to network with fellow arts administration students, arts professionals from different arts organization around the country, including staff from the Metropolitan Opera Guild. The workshop gave me additional perspectives about topics that I am learning about in my classes. At this early stage in my education, I think it is very important to gain as much insight about working in the field as I can, so that I am better prepared for my future career.

Thank you so much for taking the time to follow up with us, Angelica. We look forward to the ways in which you will integrate these new learnings and insights into the ARAD community!

Recap with Zamara Choudhary, Spring 2017 Microgrant Recipient

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We caught up with our Spring 2017 Microgrant Recipient, Zamara Choudhary.

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant supported Zamara’s participation in the National Muslim Women’s Leadership Summit at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Describe the opportunity you participated in and how it aligns with your career aspirations.

I attended The National Muslim Women’s Leadership Summit, which empowers over 50 young Muslim women from across the United States to tackle the most pressing issues facing minority communities by bringing them together for an organizing bootcamp weekend at Harvard Kennedy School. The Summit, organized and sponsored by Women’s Initiative for Self Empowerment (WISE), kicked off a year-long fellowship geared toward supporting the participants as they execute their unique projects.

The Summit provided me with a schema and a supportive network to develop Beyond Boundaries, a social media platform to enable those who identify as Muslim women to express themselves through any art form of their choosing. Set to launch in the very near future, the mission of Beyond Boundaries is to foster cross-cultural exchange and understanding by shattering the myth of the monolith and of the passivity of Muslim women.

 

What were the most important takeaways from your experience?

The Summit distilled within me an overwhelming feeling of reinvigorated passion to effect change in a world that so desperately needs it. Being surrounded by a network of such supportive, dedicated, and motivated individuals makes me believe social justice is not just a buzz phrase or a castle hidden in the clouds amidst a mythical Shangri-La— it is actually possible.

 

How has the microgrant helped to enrich you professionally?     

Without support from the ARAD microgrant, I would not have had the opportunity to cultivate relationships with a professional network with diverse interests not limited to the arts, law, film, health, and journalism. In such a connected world, I believe we must be open to collaboration with multiple fields in order to optimize the impact of our work as arts administrators.

Congratulations to our Fall 2017 Microgrant Recipients!

The Arts Administration Program (ARAD) at Teachers College, Columbia University is pleased to announce recipients of the Fall 2017 Microgrant for Student Professionalization.

 

Through the ARAD Microgrant Program and with generous support from the Arts and Humanities Department at Teachers College, ARAD proudly supports student professionalization activities on campus and beyond. This award champions special projects proposed by Teachers College student groups (with ARAD student membership), as well as conference attendance for individual students in the ARAD program.

 

Please join us in congratulating the following recipients on their Fall 2017 awards:

 

TIM

Tim Hausmann received his undergraduate degree in music theatre performance from Oklahoma City University. He then moved to New York City, where he spent six years working as an actor, singer, and dancer. After performing in the most recent Broadway revival and national tour of West Side Story, Tim decided to direct his passion for the arts into creating and advocating for meaningful performing arts experiences for others. His focus within arts administration is evaluation and assessment- specifically data-based arts advocacy and decision-making. He currently works in the research department at The Broadway League, the national trade association for the Broadway theatre industry.

The ARAD Microgrant will support Tim’s attendance at the American Evaluation Association’s “Evaluation 2017: From Learning to Action” conference. He will have the opportunity to not only meet and network with professionals working in the field of evaluation, but also to contextualize his evaluation skills and knowledge by attending professional development workshops.

 

Gillian Jakab Resized

Gillian Jakab grew up in Brooklyn. She graduated with High Distinction and Phi Beta Kappa from the Residential College of the University of Michigan in 2016, earning degrees in “Arts and Ideas in the Humanities” (an interdisciplinary history of the visual, performing, and literary arts) and in French. She has worked as editorial intern for the Lincoln Center Festival and her writing, which can be found at www.gillianjakab.com, has been published in The Brooklyn Rail and The Michigan Daily. In her graduate work, she hopes to focus on cultural policy and diplomacy.  Gillian believes the arts in general, and the performing arts in particular, are uniquely positioned to help bridge divides among cultural and political identities.

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant will support Gillian’s participation in the Congress on Research in Dance and the Society of Dance History Scholars Joint Conference, “Transmissions and Traces: Rendering Dance.” Gillian will be presenting a paper she wrote last semester on issues of cultural diplomacy in the Cold War.

 

MikesellJodi Mikesell graduated with honors from the University of Washington, where she obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Art History with a minor in Architecture. Her road to TC, Columbia University was a circuitous one with stops in costume design, event planning, art curation, accounting, and education. Before returning to school, she lived in Seattle and had worked for Amazon.com, Teatro Zinzanni, and The Northwest School of Art. Most recently, she has interned at the Baryshnikov Arts Center, where she helped to coordinate their annual visual art auction. She is currently the president of SAA (Student Advocates for the Arts), a TC student organization which helps build community among ARAD students and the greater NYC arts community, and empowers students to advocate for the importance of Art in America.

The ARAD Microgrant will support Jodi’s attendance at The Brooklyn Conference: Inspiring Social Change. There, she will be able to enhance her knowledge of where art and social change intersect and advance her goal to enact social change by leading, supporting, and working for organizations that prioritize social change through art within their missions.

 

Angelica Tran (1)​Angelica Tran graduated summa cum laude from Florida State University in 2012 with a degree in Music. Before joining the ARAD cohort, Angelica taught music in Orlando, Florida. Some of her experiences involved teaching general music in both public and private preschool and elementary schools, as well as teaching private clarinet lessons. During her spare time, she pursued volunteer opportunities with performing arts organizations in Orlando including Central Florida Community Arts and Orlando Shakespeare Theater, which helped her to develop a strong interest in arts administration. She hopes in the future to work for a performing arts organization where she can provide music opportunities that are accessible and affordable to all children.

The ARAD Microgrant will support Angelica’s participation in the DaCapo Professional Development Program for Performing Arts Management Students hosted by the Metropolitan Opera Guild. At this interactive conference, she will have the opportunity to learn about a wide variety of topics including community outreach, marketing, personnel and artist management, and other topics related to her studies.

Lauren Williams_Headshot

Lauren Williams  is from Richmond, Virginia. She attended the University of Virginia where she received her BA in New Media Design and Printmaking. Her undergraduate experience in visual arts translated into work as a full time Graphic Designer and Creative Manager supporting various industries including the arts, defense, and healthcare. She is interested in developing and utilizing art and design for positive social impact.

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant will support Lauren’s attendance at the Annual American Institute of Graphic Arts Design Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Her participation will allow her to remain current on relevant topics within her artistic field, while also supporting her future goal of impacting society through social design.

 

Follow-up with Thanh Nguyen, Spring Microgrant Recipient 

We caught up with our Spring 2017 Microgrant Recipient, Thanh Nguyen.

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant supported Thanh’s participation in the Theatre Communications Group National Conference, in Portland, Oregon. Theatre Communications Group is a national organization that provides news, resources and ideas for Broadway, regional and community theatre development. At the conference, Thanh took part of workshops related to diversity, equity and inclusion.

 

 

The Fall 2017 Microgrant applications are due on Friday, September 15, and ARAD is looking forward to supporting the next round of students in their professional development endeavors.

 


 

Check it out!

Describe the opportunity you participated in and how it aligns with your career aspirations.

I attended the 2017 Theatre Communications Group (TCG) Conference in Portland, a conference where theatre practitioners connect as peers, develop professionally and listen to aspiring thought leaders and peers in the field. Attending this conference was a professionally important goal as I aspire to build my career as a teaching artist while working towards becoming a Director of Education and Community Engagement. At the conference, I was inspired by meeting other theatre educators and artistic directors who generously shared their knowledge on building relationships through equity, diversity and inclusion, how to produce new works, and have a strong sense of self as a leader.

 

 What were the most important takeaways from your experience?

The most important takeaway I received was that equity, diversity, inclusion (EDI) begins with establishing diversity as a core value of an organization. I learned that this can be accomplished from the top down, by way of hiring EDI professionals who can make decisions laterally with artistic directors and senior level staff, by producing works that cast diverse actors and speak to diverse audiences, as well as linking funding partnership opportunities directly to theatres of color.

 

How has the microgrant helped to enrich you professionally?

Without the microgrant covering registration fees, I would not have the opportunity to connect with such amazing artistic directors, education staff and individual artists on similar successes and struggles on the subject of equity, diversity and inclusion. Thank you ARAD for making it possible!

 

Spring 2017: ARAD Microgrant Recipents

The Arts Administration Program (ARAD) at Teachers College, Columbia University is pleased to announce recipients of the Spring 2017 Microgrant for Student Professionalization.

Through the Microgrant Program and with generous support from the Arts and Humanities Department at Teachers College, ARAD proudly supports student professionalization activities on campus and beyond. This award champions special projects proposed by Teachers College student groups (with ARAD student membership), as well as conference attendance for individual students in the ARAD program. Applications were invited through an open call process, and selected by ARAD faculty.

Congratulations Zamara Choudhary and Thanh Nguyen!

Zamara HeadshotZamara Choudhary graduated summa cum laude from CUNY Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College in 2016, where she majored in History with minors in English and Arabic Studies. A native Brooklynite, Zamara enjoys exploring the diaspora of cultural organizations in New York City and dreamed of working in a museum as a child. Zamara has interned at Studio in a School, the Museum of Arts and Design, the Museum of the City of New York, and the Brooklyn Museum. She hopes to use her unique background and passion for social justice to facilitate cross-cultural understanding and exchange through the arts.

The ARAD Microgrant will support Zamara’s attendance at the National Muslim Women’s Leadership Summit at the Harvard Kennedy School. The Summit brings together a select group of 50 diverse, young Muslim women from across the U.S. to empower them to tackle the most pressing issues facing minority communities.

Thanh Nguyen HeadshotThanh Nguyen graduated from the Ohio State University (2012) with a BA in Theatre, a BS in Anthropological Sciences and minored in Spanish and evolution/ecology. Recently, he completed a year-long education fellowship at Shakespeare Theatre Company and tutors independently. Previously, Thanh worked with Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Union of Vietnamese Student Associations of the Midwest, Central Community House, American Red Cross, Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics Inc. and Association for the Advancement of Filipino American Arts and Culture. Artistically, he performed with InterACT, Worthington Community Theatre, Raconteur Theatre and Lab Series. Thanh will focus on diversity/inclusion practices within arts education programs.

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant will support Thanh’s participation in the Theatre Communications Group National Conference, in Portland, Oregon. Theatre Communications Group is a national organization that provides news, resources and ideas for Broadway, regional and community theatre development. At the conference, he will participate in the workshops related to diversity, equity and inclusion.

Founded in 2002 by graduate students in the Arts Administration program at Teachers College, Columbia University, Student Advocates for the Arts (SAA) engages students in hands-on lobbying, workshops on advocacy and cultural policy, and discussions on the American system for funding the arts. Their mission is to empower and represent student voices to influence legislation and policy affecting the arts and public artLOGOs funding.

The ARAD Microgrant will  also support a delegation of six students to attend National Arts Advocacy day in Washington D.C. This trip provides students the opportunity to meet with leading arts policy-makers, attend workshops and other events hosted by Americans for the Arts, and advocate for arts issues with district representatives and state senators.

2016-17 Microgrant Recipients

Arts Administration Announces

2016-17 Microgrant Recipients

The Arts Administration Program (ARAD) at Teachers College, Columbia University is pleased to announce recipients of the 2016-17 Microgrant for Student Professionalization.

Through the Microgrant Program, ARAD proudly supports student professionalization activities on campus and beyond. This award champions special projects proposed by Teachers College student groups (with ARAD student membership), as well as conference attendance for individual students in the ARAD program. Applications were invited through an open call process, and selected by ARAD faculty.

ARAD congratulates the following individuals on their 2016-17 academic year awards:

Mari Ogino graduated from the University of California Los Angeles with a Bachelor of Arts in Art History. Following graduation, she held positions at a contemporary art gallery in Los Angeles, the FIDM Museum, and the Wildwoods Foundation. Additionally, she volunteered with Oakgrove as the event and site coordinator. Mari is researMari-Ogino-500x500.jpgching visible and invisible barriers that prevent some children from accessing arts education. She also advocates to make arts education accessible to all children. Arts accessibility is the driving force behind her decision to pursue an M.A. in Arts Administration; she wants to ensure that arts programs are fully funded and sustainable.

The ARAD Microgrant will support Mari’s attendance at the National Arts Marketing Conference in Austin, Texas. The conference will provide her with professional development and networking opportunities, as well as access to presentations and workshops on best practices in arts marketing.

 

Kelly Olshan graduated Valedictorian from UNC Asheville, where she received her BFA in Painting and a minor in business management As an undergraduate, she served as President of the University’s arts organization. Before enrolling in the Arts Administration program, she s$RDPQOAE.jpgerved as the Local Arts Advancement intern for Americans for the Arts. As both an arts administrator and practicing artist, Kelly owns and manages her own fine art business. After graduation, she is invested in establishing more fiscal and educational resources for contemporary artists.

Funding from the ARAD Microgrant will support Kelly’s participation in the Conference on Social Theory, Politics and the Arts in Montreal, Quebec. The conference convenes arts 
managers, researchers, and cultural practitioners to discuss key issues in the field. Kelly presented her ARAD thesis, After Art School: Professional Development Training in Nonprofit Organizations.

 

Gina Tribotti graduated from the University of California, San Diego, with a Bachelor’s degree in Visual Arts (Media-Film/Video). She has worked as a stage manager, projectionist, and playwright. From 2010 to 2012, Gina served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Central Asian country of Kyrgyzstan, where she developed arts curriculum for hearing impaired children, taught participatory theater, and led $REK5J48.jpgdevelopment initiatives. Her current work at Sotheby’s Institute offers an opportunity to explore how markets shape the global art world. She hopes to work on implementation of site-specific and community-based projects with arts organizations throughout New York City.

The ARAD Microgrant will support Gina’s participation in the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association Annual Conference. She will be presenting a paper on the tensions of culture-led redevelopment. The conference will help her explore ways in which academic settings can help frame and develop her ideas.

Arts Administration Announces Inaugural Microgrant Recipients

PRINT LOGO (THREE COLOR)The M.A. Program in Arts Administration (ARAD) at Teachers College, Columbia University is pleased to announce the inaugural recipients of the Microgrant for student professionalization.

Through the newly-initiated Microgrant Program, ARAD proudly supports student professionalization activities on campus and beyond. This award champions special projects proposed by Teachers College student groups (with ARAD student membership), as well as conference attendance for individual students in the ARAD program. Applications were invited through an open call process, and vetted by an ARAD faculty and staff selection committee.

ARAD congratulates the following student groups and individuals on their 2015-16 academic year awards:

Continue reading “Arts Administration Announces Inaugural Microgrant Recipients”