Audrée Anid ‘17 brings her perspective to NY’s art world with new exhibitions

AANIDprofileimageAudrée Anid ’17 is Lebanese-American mixed-media artist and independent curator whose work spans photography, painting, and printmaking. Audrée was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan and grew up in the Bronx, New York. She holds a B.A. in Studio Art from Wesleyan University in Connecticut and an M.A. in Arts Administration from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York. She has exhibited at Photoville NYC at Brooklyn Bridge Park, Humble Arts Foundation, Equity Gallery, Brooklyn Fire Proof Gallery, Gallery at BRIC House, and Space Womb Gallery, among others. International exhibitions include Arts Suzhou in Suzhou, China and The Beirut Contemporary Global Art Fair in Beirut, Lebanon.  She was recently selected as an artist in the Artist on Art Program at Olana State Historic Site, in Hudson, New York in partnership with IAIA I Institute of Arab and Islamic Art in New York. She is based in Brooklyn, New York.

We caught up with Audrée to learn more about her work and upcoming exhibitions:

Tell us about what you are working on now.

As far as my art practice goes, I’m working on a few different projects simultaneously in my art studio in Bushwick. I’ve been working on a body of oil paintings entitled Formations, since last August. The paintings depict fragments of media imagery culled from online coverage of the ongoing Civil War in Syria.  I’m interested in the ways in which we decode and process digital information, examining what we chose to ignore and what we pay attention to. I’ve also been exploring text and language by printing and painting on paper. I’ve made over 100 of these works on paper since October (these will be shown in Chelsea on July 12th).

I recently launched RATA Projects, a curatorial initiative with independent curator, Rachel Tretter. RATA Projects grew out of a need and desire to give emerging artists a voice in the very competitive arts landscape of New York City.

How did it come together?

RATA Projects came together after Rachel and I (who both work at commercial galleries) wanted to pursue our own curatorial vision and found an engaging space to do so. The gallery itself is a unique space that comes equipped with a discreetly hidden speakeasy. We approached the owners of the space with a clear vision and proposal of the show, including a list of artists we would pursue. Since our first meeting, we’ve been focused on planning, outreach, and organizing, applying our collective knowledge toward the inaugural show, Skip/Salvage.  

Can you share more about the messages for these exhibitions?

Skip/Salvage focuses on collage and sculptural constructions, with works comprised of domestic remnants, byproducts of manufacturing, and fragmentary objects from daily life recontextualized to create new meaning. The pieces in the show denote a specific place and time, often borrowing from the landscape of New York City as well as the artists’ personal memories. All of the artists in the show are based in New York and incorporate elements of the city into their work.

Eminent Domain is a flash exhibition of intersectional feminist art in Chelsea where I will be showing a 5-foot installation of works on paper. The painted words and phrases stem from personal interactions, text-message exchanges, and fragments of phrases borrowed from apologies that have been issued and circulated by the media by influential figures in society. The guerilla/flash format of this exhibition is intended to disrupt the norm of the white-box/blue-chip nexus of galleries in Chelsea. I think it’s incredibly important to give women a platform to showcase their work, especially since women make up such a small percentage of representation on gallery rosters. The artists in this exhibition are diverse; they include established feminist pioneers like Marilyn Minter, to more emerging voices (like myself).

How did ARAD prepare you for projects like these?

While in grad school, I honed my ability to multitask and prioritize responsibilities and I’ve certainly applied this work-ethic to my current projects. The extensive writing and analysis my courses encouraged have served me well in crafting proposals, press releases, and other written media.  My professors always challenged me to push my thinking further, shifting my ideas out of an abstract realm and into a clear material one, which I think my art practice has benefitted from.

Congrats to Audrée! We look forward to checking out Eminent Domain and Skip/Salvage.

 

Interview with visiting scholar Léonie Hénaut

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Over the past few months, ARAD has enjoyed the company of visiting scholar Léonie Hénaut. Hénaut is an Associate Professor at the National Center for Scientific Research, and a member of the Center for the Sociology of Organizations at Sciences Po in Paris. She is also a permanent faculty member of Science Po’s Department of Sociology. Hénaut received a BA, MA, and PhD in Sociology from University Paris 8, and her BA in Art History from the Ecole du Louvre. Her personal webpage and publications are available here.


Hénaut studies work, occupations and organizations. Her primary focus is on professionalization and organizational rationalization, and how the two processes interact with each other and transform the division of labor. During her time with ARAD, she has been working on her book project on museums in the U.S., provisionally titled “The Rise of Pluri-Professionalism: Transforming the Division of Labor in American Museums.” The book documents the shift of museums toward an increasingly diverse set of knowledge-based occupations in addition to traditional curators.

Hénaut shared more details about her work with Sunny Leerasanthanah, ARAD 19.

Read the full interview transcript below!

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Faculty News: Prof. Jennifer Lena review of “Artifacts and Allegiances: How Museums Put the Nation and the World on Display”

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Contemporary Sociology cover

ARAD’s own Dr. Jennifer Lena recently published a review of Peggy Levitt’s “Artifacts and Allegiances: How Museums Put the Nation and the World on Display” (2015).  The article, released in the January 2017 edition of Contemporary Sociology, reviews Levitt’s examination of how museums define and depict the identities of their local audiences.  In addition to appraising Levitt’s exploration of nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and cultural policy in museological practice, Dr. Lena also includes recommendations for educators who use the book as a class resource.

To read the full article, click here!

2016 Arts Advocacy Day Reflection

By Blaire Townshend

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SAA meets Americans for the Arts President Bob Lynch

It has been quite the busy month for Student Advocates for the Arts. Those of us in our first year with the group have gone through a graduation of sorts—we have been transformed from arts enthusiasts to true arts advocates with practical experience under our belts. When we hosted a lobbying workshop with Ann Marie Miller of ArtPride at the beginning of the month, our questions ranged from “how do you make an effective ask?” to “what are the buzzwords that legislators pay attention to?” This was a crash course of sorts, and Ann Marie was wonderfully patient with us as we attempted to sort out the building blocks of arts advocacy.

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Alumni Event: Mentoring as Advocacy

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Alumni and students enjoying the event. Photo courtesy of Alexis Yuen.

This February, the ARAD Alumni Committee launched a mentorship program for 2nd-year students. The goal is to build personal and professional connections that give ARAD students an advantage as they leave the program and enter the world of arts administration. Co-presented by the ARAD Alumni Committee, the ARAD Program, and Student Advocates for the Arts, the event Mentoring as Advocacy was the kick-off for the mentorship program where students, faculty, and alumni were able to meet and network.

MENTORING AS ADVOCACY: LAUNCH OF THE ARAD MENTORSHIP PROGRAM
Tuesday, February 9, 6-8:30PM
Nuyorican Poets Café, 236 E. 3rd Street, Manhattan

Current student Alyssa Yuen shares her reflection on the event here.

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Arts Administration Announces Inaugural Microgrant Recipients

PRINT LOGO (THREE COLOR)The M.A. Program in Arts Administration (ARAD) at Teachers College, Columbia University is pleased to announce the inaugural recipients of the Microgrant for student professionalization.

Through the newly-initiated Microgrant Program, ARAD proudly supports student professionalization activities on campus and beyond. This award champions special projects proposed by Teachers College student groups (with ARAD student membership), as well as conference attendance for individual students in the ARAD program. Applications were invited through an open call process, and vetted by an ARAD faculty and staff selection committee.

ARAD congratulates the following student groups and individuals on their 2015-16 academic year awards:

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Event News: Student Advocate for the Arts-Reflecting on the Hill

unnamedJoin Student Advocates for the Arts (SAA) this upcoming Tuesday as they discuss their recent trip to Washington, DC for Arts Advocacy Day. Come learn more about the organization, what they did in DC, and how you can help advocate for the arts!

Date: Tuesday, April 21st, 2015
Time: 6:30-8:00pm
Location: Zankel 109
RSVP at artsadvocates.cu@gmail.com

“Creative Calling: Managing the Arts”- ARAD Alumni Panel on April 11th

The Arts Administration (ARAD) Program and Alumni Committee invite you to attend this year’s alumni panel, ‘Creative Calling: Managing the Arts,’ hosted during Teachers College’s Academic Festival!

Creative Calling: Managing the Arts
2:30pm – 3:30pm
Saturday, April 11th 2015
Teachers College, Columbia University
Co-sponsored by the ARAD Program and Alumni Committee
Click here to RSVP
Free for current students!Moderator: 
Priya Sircar, 2011
Senior Consultant, Lord Cultural Resources

Panelists:  
Daniel Gallant, 2004
Executive Director, Nuyorican Poets Cafe
Javier Iturralde de Bracamonte, 2010
Founder & Global Managing Director, Visionaer Consulting
Alison Kaplan, 1992
AMK Management and Consulting, Lead Consultant
Leigh Ross, 2012
Program Associate, Hive Digital Media Learning Fund at New York Community Trust
Michiko Simanjuntak Grasso, 2001
Director of Individual Giving, Japan Society

Description:

In order to respond to the challenges and responsibilities facing the arts, an arts manager must have an amalgam of managerial and financial skills, an investment in ethical and policy issues, a broad knowledge about artistic disciplines, an awareness of community dynamics, a commitment to education and a sensitivity to the artist and the artistic process. But how does this translate professionally? This alumni panel will explore various paths taken and the skills employed for a successful career as an Arts Administrator.

Faculty News: Prof. Jennifer Lena on US Cultural Engagement with Global Muslim Communities

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GIA Reader cover from artist Nicholas Galanin (b. 1979, Sitka, Alaska)

ARAD’s own Dr. Jennifer Lena recently published an article titled “US Cultural Engagement with Global Muslim Communities: Contours and Connections in an Emerging Field” with co-author Erin Johnston. The article, released in the Winter 2015 edition of GIA Reader, looks at the challenges Muslim artists experience when producing art to engage US audiences. In addition to surveying the difficulties the field faces, the authors also note that these challenges highlight opportunities for future cross-cultural exchanges, collaborations, and expansions of Muslim/Islamic art in the United States.

To read the full article, click here!

Event News: “Building Bridges: Museums, Communities and Latin American Art”

unnamedJoin the Association of Latin American Students (ALAS) at Teachers College, Columbia University as they discuss the intersection between museums, education and diverse communities in their upcoming event, “Building Bridges: Museums, Communities and Latin American Art.” This talk is part of the organization’s “Serie en Conversaciones.”

Given the increasing international recognition of Latin American art and its presence in collections and exhibitions in local art museums, this panel seeks to explore the connection between museums and its surrounding diverse communities, the societal influence of museums that exhibit Latin American art, and the role of these museums in promoting cultural diversity. Our featured guests include Remei Capdevila from El Museo del Barrio and Nung-Hsin Hu from Queens Museum, who will engage in a conversation moderated by Teachers College faculty member, Olga Hubard.

Date: Thursday, April 2, 2015
Location: 138 Horace Mann, Teachers College
Time: 7:00 pm

Free admission
RSVP HERE